Kaveri Raina at Hammond Harkins Galleries, Columbus, Ohio

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Prefer the Past,  Acrylic, burlap, 70 x 40 inches

Alchemy is occurring at Hammond Harkins Galleries in Columbus, Ohio where Kaveri Raina has opened a portal to another world in her magical first solo at the gallery.

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Prefer the Past (detail) 

Kaveri, a native of New Delhi, spent part of her childhood in India before relocating to the United States in 2000, and the works on display at Hammond Harkins reflect that dual sense of place. But it would be a disservice to Ms. Raina to say the canvases merely straddle two worlds; They create new ones. By fusing her connections with India, it’s traditions, colors, textures and mythology with a contemporary approach to painting Ms. Raina re-interprets centuries of tradition with fresh eyes, synthesizing a bridge between past and future. The paintings burlap supports, referencing the vessels that transported the rice and staples of her youth and the humble textiles of the marginalized become transportive vessels of another sort under Kaveri’s skillful hand. Painting from both the back and front of the support and using the burlap’s rugged, tactile transparency, Ms. Kaveri evokes the push and pull of past and present, the ephemeral and the visceral, the seen and unseen, the forgotten and the remembered. Her use of overlapping mythical forms, staining of surface and lush layered color further envelope the viewer in a landscape of dreams and memory, awakening the senses and catapulting the viewer from the temporal realm into the sensual beyond.

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Gallery view from entrance

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Walking Around, Acrylic, oil pastel, burlap, 60 x 48 Inches

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From left: Shy Around and Prefer the Past

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Shy Around,  Acrylic, burlap, 60 x 48 Inches

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From Right: Will I Be Missed (Future), Overthrow Slightly and Stray Delight

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Will I Be Missed (Future), Acrylic, dye, burlap, 70 x 40 Inches

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Overthrow Slightly, Acrylic, dye, burlap, 70 x 40 Inches

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Stray Delight, Acrylic, burlap, 70 x 40 inches

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From right: Forgotten Pleasures, Shy In, Hanuman Mukut and Will I Be Missed

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Forgotten Pleasures, Acrylic, dye, burlap , 70 x 40 inches

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Forgotten Pleasures (Detail)

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Shy In, Acrylic, burlap, 60 x 48 Inches

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Hanuman Mukut

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Will I Be Missed, Acrylic, dye, burlap, 70 x 40 inches

For more information about Hammond Harkins Galleries and Kaveri Raina please check out their websites at:

http://www.hammondharkins.com

http://www.kaveriraina.com

Harmony Hammond at Alexander Gray Associates

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Bandaged Grid #1, 2015, Oil and Mixed Media on Canvas 44.25″ x 76.5″ x 5″

I’ve never thought of canvas like skin but these works by Harmony Hammond in her recent solo at Alexander Gray Associates have a corporeal aspect. They are distinctly mortal. From the moment one enters the gallery and turns left to see Bandaged Grid #1. One feels the presence of body and all of the serene messiness that comes with being human. These works are peeled, torn, painted, pierced and layered. Yet nothing is obvious. One must lean in to really listen to them and see them as they are. These pieces felt like the doors between the living and the dead in Egyptian Mastabas. One foot distinctly in the physical world at once fleshy, mortal and concrete, and yet simultaneously of the mystical realm.

For more information about Harmony Hammond please check out the Alexander Gray Associates website at:

http://www.alexandergray.com/artists/harmony-hammond/

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Bandaged Grid #1 (Detail)

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Bandaged Grid #1 (Detail)

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Ledger Drawings, 2015, One of Suite of Five Ink on Paper, 11.75″ x 9.5″

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Ledger Drawings (Detail)

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From left: Naples Grid and Things Various

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Naples Grid, 2015, Oil and Mixed Media on Canvas, 80.25″ x 54.5″ x 5

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Things Various, 2015, Oil and Mixed Media on Canvas, 80.25″ x 54.25″ x 5

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White Rims #7, 2015, Monotype on Paper with Metal Grommets, 47″ x 33.5″

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White Rims #7 (Detail)

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White Rims #4, 2015, Monotype on Paper with Metal Grommets, 47″ x 33.5″

Philip Guston: Painter 1957 – 1967 at Hauser & Wirth

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Philip Guston: Painter 1957 – 1967 at Hauser & Wirth, New York covers the pivotal decade in Guston’s career during which the artist broke from abstraction, which made him famous in the 1950’s, and began a return to figuration.. The exhibition, a collection of 36 paintings and 56 drawings, is an absorbing exploration of the journey of process and experimentation that transformed the artist’s oeuvre.

For more information about the exhibition and Philip Guston please check out the Hauser & Wirth website at:

http://www.hauserwirth.com/exhibitions/2722/philip-guston-painter-1957-y-1967/view/

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From left: Traveller III, 1959 – 1960 & Painter, 1959, both Oil on Canvas

Painter courtesy of the High Museum of Art, Atlanta

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From left: Turn, 1959, Oil on Panel & Turnabout, 1959, Oil on paper mounted on Panel

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Turn, 1959, Oil on Panel, 22 5/8″ x 28 1/2″ Private Collection

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Turnabout, 1959, Oil on Panel, 22 1/8″ x 30 1/8″ Private Collection

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Untitled, c. 1959. Oil on paper mounted on panel, 18 1/8″ x 24 1/8″, Private Collection

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Untitled, 1958, Oil on Canvas, 64 1/8 x 75 1/4″, Private Collection

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Accord I, 1962, Oil on Canvas, 68 1/8 x 78 1/8″, Private Collection

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From Left: Vessel, 1960 and Slope II, 1961, both works Oil on panel

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Vessel, 1960, Oil on panel, 30 1/8″ x 21 7/8″, Private Collection

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Slope II, 1961, Oil on paper mounted on canvas, 40 1/2″ x 30 3/4″, Private Collection

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From left: Portrait I, 1965, Stranger, 1964 and Reverse, 1965 . All works Oil on Canvas

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Looking, 1964, Oil on Canvas, 67 7/8″ x 80 1/8″, Private Collection

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Painter III, 1963, Oil on Canvas, 66″ x 79″, Private Collection, London

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Untitled, 1967 – 1969, 48 Drawings, Charcoal and Ink on Paper, Variable Dimensions, Private Collection

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From left: Inhabiter, 1965, May Sixty-Five, 1965 and Afternoon, 1964

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May Sixty-Five, 1965, Oil on Canvas, 70″ x 80″, Lewis Family Collection

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Afternoon, 1964, Oil on Canvas, 74″ x 80 1/4″, Private Collection

Electric Lady Land at REBEL art space

Electric Lady Land at REBEL art space in the Back Street Arts District in Palm Springs is a survey of 14 LA based female artists curated by Susan Carter Hall. The show is part of REBEL art space’s goal to introduce local art collectors to a wide range of new and established talent, and this curatorial cross pollination at REBEL is a growing trend locally to bring LA based artists to the Coachella valley to show their work. One of the first curators to do this was Mike McLain, an LA and Coachella based artist, who began a geographic creative cross pollination project at the Coachella Valley Art Center called LAnCV. But Electric Lady Land strikes its own path by focusing solely on female artists from the LA area.

For more information about REBEL art space please check out their website at

http://www.rebelps.com

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Dianna Cohen, rainbow us, Plastic bags and thread, 2010

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Dianna Cohen (detail))

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Suné Woods, In Flight(3), Mixed media collage, 2016

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Stephanie Vovas, Rachel in Los Angeles, Archival pigment print, 2015

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Tanya Batura, Monochrome J, Clay & acrylic, 2010

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Essi Zimm, I am the King of  the Cats, Mixed media collage and oil on panel board, 2016

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Essi Zimm (detail)

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Laurie Yehia, 18 AT BAY, Switch plates and oil paint on wood panel, 2016

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Maja Ruznic, The Forgiver Has Forgiven But Emotional Memory Lingers

Oil on Canvas, 2016

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Maja Ruznic, (detail)

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Susan Carter Hall, In Loving Memory, Oil on Canvas, 2015

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Susan Carter Hall (detail)

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Erin Morrison, Red Palm, Ink and wax on gypsum cement, 2016

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Erin Morrison (detail)

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Kim Kei, Was it You, Was it Me, Ink and oil on paper, 2015

Barbara Ellmann: An Open Book 2 at the Marks Art Center

I had the great pleasure of seeing Barbara Ellmann’s dynamic exhibition, An Open Book 2, at the Walter N. Marks Center for the Arts in Palm Desert, California last month. The exhibition, which ran from February 4 to March 11, was partially funded by the McCallum Theatre Institute’s Aesthetic Education Program, produced in conjunction with the Marks Art Center at the College of the Desert and was beautifully curated by Sophia Marisa Lucas. The Marks always presents terrifically exciting, innovative shows and I am continually impressed by the quality of their curatorial focus. An Open Book 2 was no exception.

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For more information about the Marks Art Center and Barbara Ellmann:

http://www.collegeofthedesert.edu/community/gallery/Pages/default.aspx

https://barbaraellmann.com

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REPEAT/RECREATE: Clyfford Still’s “Replicas” at the Clyfford Still Museum, Denver

I’ll freely admit that I had a religious experience on viewing REPEAT/RECREATE: Clyfford Still’s “Replicas” at Denver’s Clyfford Still Museum. It’s unusual to get inside an artist’s head but every now and then an exhibition does just that, and this is one of those shows.

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Left: PH-1074, 1956-59 (1956-J-No.2) Right: PH-225, 1956 (1956-J-No.2)

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PH-225, 1956 (1956-J-No.2), Oil on canvas, 115″ x 104 3/4″

Collection of Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Museum purchase, The Benjamin J. Tillar Memorial Trust

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PH-1074, 1956-59 (1956-J-No.2), Oil on canvas, 117″ x 108″

Clyfford Still Museum

The Clyfford Still Museum is unique among world museums in that it houses the work of a single artist and it’s holdings comprise 94% of Still’s creative output including his archive of personal effects and correspondence. Still who said, “My painting is a life statement, not an autobiography,” was notoriously prickly about how his work was viewed and eschewed wall cards and any explanation of the work itself, preferring that the viewer find their way into the work on their own. REPEAT/RECREATE is a fascinating window into the artist’s thought process and how subtle shifts in scale, texture and color can influence one’s perception of what is, at first glance, a similar image.

What is unique about this exhibition, and what I found particularly moving,  is that it illustrates what many working artists experience in their creative practice; the constant investigation and questioning that takes place on a daily basis in the studio. Still made “replicas” of more than 50 works. These were not copies but in depth “re-explorations”. In some instances a similar composition was kept but the chromology was radically re-imagined. In most cases though there were more subtle changes; shifts in medium, shifts in application of paint, shifts in texture, shifts in the play of light across the paint surface through the manipulation of the reflective properties of the paint. All of these re-imaginings profoundly effect the viewer’s perception of the composition.

“Although the few replicas I make are usually close to or extensions of the original, each has its special and particular life and is not intended to be just a copy. The present work clarified certain factors and, paradoxically in this instance, was closer to my original concept than the first painitng, which bore the ambivalences of struggle.”

More information about the Clyfford Still Museum and it’s extraordinary collection can be found on their website.

Home

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PH-855, 1928-29, Oil on canvas, 34 1/4″ x 44 1/2″

Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of International Business Machines Corporation

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PH-422, 1929, Oil on canvas, 23 1/2″ x 31″

Clyfford Still Museum

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PH-938, 1937/39 (?) (Study in Line; 1937-No 1), Oil on canvas, 51″ x 34″

Lent by Sara & Edward Germain in memory of Ashley & Alysse Weeks

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PH-553, 1937 (1937-No-2), Oil on canvas, 56 1/2″ x 36 1/2″

Clyfford Still Museum

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PH-938, 1937/39 (?) (Study in Line; 1937-No 1) Detail

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PH-553, 1937 (1937-No-2) Detail

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PL-21, 1943, Lithograph, 16 5/8″ x 12 1/2″

Clyfford Still Museum

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Left: PH-244, 1953 (1953-No.1), Oil on Canvas, 108 1/2″ x 91 1/2″

Right: PHX-27, undated, Oil on Canvas, 114 1/2″ x 104 1/2″

Clyfford Still Museum

What’s interesting about these two images, it’s difficult to see in the photographs, is the application of paint. In the painting on the left the paint is applied almost vertically from top to bottom and in the painting on the right the paint is applied in a sweeping pattern. From across the room the paintings feel similar, but when the viewer gets closer their emotional impact shifts because you become aware of the textural gesture of the paint and the energy of the paint surface.

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PH-244, 1953 (1953-No.1) Detail

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PHX-27, undated, Detail

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Left: PH-1111, 1952, Oil on Canvas, 91″ x 69 3/8″       Right: PP-135, 1956, Pastel on Paper, 13 3/4″ x 11″

PH-816, 1951 (1951-No.2/3?), Oil on canvas, 46 3/4″ x 38″

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Bequest of Caroline Wiess Law

This is another interesting example of how the medium influences the “feeling” of the work. The painting on the left has an almost muscular paint surface, with thick grainy applications of paint, and the image on the right is a very soft pastel. The powdery surface completely changes the way the work feels. Same composition, same colors, but very different feeling as a viewer from these two works.

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Left: PH-89, 1949 (1949-A-No.1)   Right: PH-177, 1949 (1949-A-No.2)

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PH-89, 1949 (1949-A-No.1), Oil on canvas, 93″ x 79″, Private Collection

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PH-177, 1949 (1949-A-No.2), Oil on canvas, 80″ x 68 1/2″, Glenstone

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PH-89, 1949 (1949-A-No.1) Detail

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PH-177, 1949 (1949-A-No.2) Detail

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Left: PH-235, 1944 (1944-N-No.1) Right: PH-671 (1944-N-No.2;Red Flash on Black Field)

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PH-235, 1944 (1944-N-No.1), Oil on Canvas, 105″ x 92 1/2″

Clyfford Still Museum

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PH-671 (1944-N-No.2;Red Flash on Black Field), Oil on canvas, 104 1/4″ x 87 1/4″

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Sydney and Harriet Janis Collection, 1967

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Left: PH-813-(1951-T-No.2) Center: PH-814 (1951-T-No.3) Right: PH-812, 1951 (1951-T-No.1)

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PH-813-(1951-T-No.2), Oil on canvas, 93 1/4″ x 75 3/4″, Detroit Institute of Arts, Founders Society Purchase

W. Hawkins Ferry Fund

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PH-814 (1951-T-No.3), Oil on canvas, 94″ x 82″

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Blanchette Hooker Rockerfeller Fund, 1954

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PH-812, 1951 (1951-T-No.1), Oil on canvas, 115″ x 104″

Clyfford Still Museum

What’s interesting about this image is that the painting is labeled No.1 but this is indeed the fourth “replica” of this painting. The first was destroyed by the artist. Versions 2 and 3 are in correct order.

Nick Theobald: With Honey From The Rock at Richard Taittinger Gallery

There is a particular sensation that comes with rain. Time slows and one’s tactile appreciation of touch, sound and smell is heightened. One luxuriates in that sensation as the perception of time slows with the elongated drumming pause that accompanies the steady fall of liquid from the sky. I felt that sense of suspension while viewing Nick Theobald’s almost reverential solo at Richard Taittinger Gallery on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The works present in the gallery slow one’s sense of time and bathe the viewer in their tranquil, organic materiality like rain.

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More information about Nick Theobald and Richard Taittinger Gallery can be found on their websites below. With Honey From The Rock runs through December 12th. Richard Taittinger Gallery , 154 Ludlow Street, New York, NY.

http://richardtaittinger.com

http://nick-theobald.com

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